Tag Archives: Cheers and Regards

Cheers and Regards for the Week of May 31, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the counterfeit jeans operation you’re running out of your car hole; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to Glenn Greenwald at Salon for a particularly devastating take-down of an especially condescending New York Times piece on those wacky Muslims and the absolutely cuh-razy conspiracy theories they believe…by presenting a long list of equally baseless beliefs that the American news media has pushed on the public. Such as Iraq’s nuclear weapons program. Or the “rescue” of Jessica Lynch. Or Pat Tillman not dying by friendly fire. Or, well, you get the idea. (DW)

REGARDS to the Philadelphia Daily News for being unable to work just one more instance of the phrase “‘East Side’ tattooed on his upper lip” into this reworking of an AP wire story. Just over thirty percent of the sentences in the story contain the phrase “‘East Side’ tattooed on his upper lip” and we believe that number should have been at least fifty or sixty percent. It’s like they’re not even trying to put the phrase “‘East Side’ tattooed on his upper lip” into articles any longer. For shame, Daily News, for shame.

Oh, and also- “‘East Side’ tattooed on his upper lip.” (RJW)

CHEERS to the Sun-Herald in coastal Mississippi for asserting that its photographer, and by proxy the press in general, should have access to public spaces where public officials are without the threat of arrest. If only there were some old piece of paper somewhere that guaranteed such a thing. (DL)
REGARDS to the Wall Street Journal, which is apparently busy doing whatever else it is doing to issue simple corrections to name misspellings in book reviews. Or to respond to someone pointing out the misspelling. One suspects if the “broken glass” theory of law enforcement applied to a newspaper’s trustworthiness, the Journal is in for some trouble in the near future. (KL)
CHEERS to reporters and photographers in the Gulf of Mexico demanding, even under threat of arrest, to have access to areas affected by the continuing oil leak. (MW)

REGARDS to the Chicago Tribune‘s management for including a third round of executive bonuses in its Chapter 11 filing, bringing the grand total so far to $72 million. While every reporter in America is fighting to justify their position, the men and women who’ve routinely called the (bad) shots are cashing in. And businesses like AIG and Lehman Brothers have proven what great business a great business model that is. (KL)

REGARDS to NPR for looking at a president’s willing ownership of a major catastrophe and only seeing the political implications. At some point, we have to stop looking at this like a damn football game and start looking at it like the disaster it is. (KL)

Cheers and Regards for the Week of May 24, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the hamsters you’re trying to genetically engineer to have human-like intelligence; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to Denver Post editor Greg Moore for asking his staff to answer a question many editors are too scared to ask: Is our paper boring? And just as important, are the paper’s decreasing resources being used in a way that could make it interesting? The answer at most papers is, “probably,” and “probably not,” respectively.

REGARDS to James Rainey at the Los Angeles Times’ On the Media blog for his column arguing about how Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan’s sexuality shouldn’t matter by discussing her sexuality and the reasons to question it at length.

CHEERS to the Hollywood Reporter for sticking by its guns and getting a real-life scoop on NBC’s fall lineup, even though they likely knew full well that the network would be none too happy about it.

REGARDS to the Oregonian for firing 12-year reporter Lisa Grace Lednicer for freelancing. Lednicer co-wrote a story in Glamour about a murder 26 years ago, and the editors at the Oregonian apparently thought that this breaking story from half a century ago should have been theirs first.

CHEERS to the Washington Post for making more of an effort to correct its mistakes. For whatever reason, the newsroom had done little to deal with a backlog of correction requests, but according to ombudsman Andrew Alexander, that mindset has changed for the better.

REGARDS to the Morgantown Dominion Post in West Virginia for (pretty badly) Photoshopping three delegates out of a posed photo of Gov. Joe Manchin signing a new law regarding hit-and-run incidents. The reason they removed the delegates? They didn’t want to run a photo of politicians who are up for re-election. Well, guys, get another photo or don’t run one.

Cheers and Regards for the Week of May 17, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the nitrous oxide you thought you so cleverly hid in some helium tanks; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to the Los Angeles Times‘ Jill Loevy for starting the blog The Homicide Report, which sought to tell the stories of every homicide victim in the Los Angeles area. It was Leovy’s belief that the media’s tendency to cover only strange murders–and consequently to ignore everyday folks who died–was a disservice. (KL)

REGARDS to Gawker and writer Adrian Chen who, in a “where are they now” piece on Tom Hintnaus, the first Calvin Klein underwear model, described the life of a fit, healthy, ruggedly handsome fifty-something man who owns his own business in Hawaii as “tragic.” Because he apparently had the audacity to actually grow older gracefully instead of dying young and pretty. (DW)

CHEERS to a group of laid-off Baltimore Sun employees for finding a place to tell their stories. Their brand new site includes photos, videos, poems and essays about what brought them to journalism and why they still stand behind the profession. Their work shows an optimism not common among many struggling ex-reporters right now. (MW)

REGARDS to Chicago Mayor Richard Daley for what basically amounts to an intimidation campaign against journalists trying to get information with his plan to post all requests for Freedom of Information Act Requests on a city website. So much for exclusive, well-researched enterprise stories in the Windy City. (MW)

CHEERS and REGARDS to the Chicago Tribune for its story and subsequent correction regarding President Barack Obama reportedly describing Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan as “a trailblazing lady.” The only problem? Obama didn’t say “lady.” He said “leader.” But the Tribune had the good sense to admit its mistake and give itself a good tongue-lashing over the error. And, you know, it’s a pretty fair assumption to think a politician could say a stupid thing, even though this time it wasn’t the case. (MW)

Cheers and Regards for the Week of May 10, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about your unlicensed plastic surgery practice; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to the Arizona Republic for calling out state and federal officials, name by name, for alternately ignoring the illegal immigration problem or using it to pander to public fears. This is nonpartisan editorializing at its finest. (KL)

REGARDS to the Baltimore Sun for inserting an inane “give me your cynical, fact-free gut reaction” poll after an article specifically refuting the poll’s basis. Web 2.0! (KL)

CHEERS to the folks of PolitiFact.com for making an effort to bring their brand of scrutiny to politicians’ truths, half-truths and outright lies to all 50 states in a sort of verification franchise. (MW)

REGARDS to WorldNetDaily for finding it newsworthy to report the names of journalists who had unfavorable reactions, ostensibly sent in personal e-mails, to the site’s newest book, The Manchurian President. Also, regards to Mother Jones for seemingly finding it worthwhile to repeat it. (MW)

CHEERS to Newsweek‘s Andrew Romano for taking TV and print news outlets to task for essentially ignoring the devastating floods in Nashville for two reasons: the “feedback loop” that makes news outlets feel OK as long as their competitors aren’t reporting it and a narrative lacking in comparison to the BP oil spill and the attempted Times Square attack. The fact that thousands lost their homes and dozens died seems to have not had much effect. (MW)

REGARDS to writer Alexa von Tobel and the Huffington Post for being beyond clueless about how everyone who isn’t a Manhattan CEO lives and allowing that cluelessness to take up space on the Internet, respectively. Maybe for her next post she could see what it’s like to take her head out of her ass! Also: Extra regards points to the HuffPo for deleting every single comment pointing out Ms. von Tobel’s head-up-ass problem. (DL and MW)

Cheers and Regards for the Week of May 3, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about your experiments involving gorillas and human vocal cords; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to the New York Times for standing by its reporters, who have detailed the international criminal conspiracy that has kept child molestors working with children. They seem to have weathered every bad-faith argument in the book. (KL)

REGARDS to Newsweek, for their puzzling web article arguing that gay actors are incapable of playing straight roles. Author Ramin Setoodeh, whose previous writings on gay issues included an essay about how effeminate men hurt the cause of gay rights, attempts to make the patently absurd case that openly gay actors are apparently not good enough at acting to play heterosexual roles, even though the fault seems to be with Setoodeh for his inability to overlook the fact that an actor is gay when watching a television program or film. That gay men and women have played straight roles throughout the history of film and television is a fact that Setoodeh is apparently willingly remaining unaware of. (DW)

CHEERS to the Philadelphia Daily News for going above and beyond in the service of bad news puns in an article about some guys getting beat up by a crowd after showing up to a hardcore show in full Nazi regalia. The headline, “Concertgoers show the Reich stuff, are beaten by crowd,” would have been enough on its own but then- THEN- you get to the lede- “How did they Nazi this coming?”

Well played, People Paper. Well played. (RJW)

REGARDS to the San Diego Union-Tribune for not only changing its name for a day for the sake of a Wells Fargo ad on the front page, but for also running an ad that looks like an old-time Western photo you’d get at Tweetsie Railroad. (MW)

CHEERS to Slate’s Jack Shafer for pointing out all the practical reasons checkbook journalism isn’t a good idea, in light of the recent Gizmodo/Apple stolen/lost iPhone story. (MW)

REGARDS to the Associated Press — the world’s largest newsgathering organization — for apparently trying to stop the release of e-mails between its reporters and aides of New York Mayor David Paterson. Good luck with that next FOIA request, members of the news media! (MW)

Cheers and Regards for the Week of April 26, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the hooker you stopped to chat with the night you were inaugurated as mayor; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to Time‘s Tuned In blog for pointing out the habit of media companies, especially FOX, to criticize themselves, in the one-hand-not-knowing-what-the-other-is-doing fashion of the day. (MW)

REGARDS to The Baltimore Sun’s Jules Witcover, who after preambling his column by saying he doesn’t want to sound like an old fogy, proceeds to call Twitter a “poisonous virus” among other things. He then takes a shot at blogging straight out of 2005, blaming the tools for their misuse, and not the users. (KL)

CHEERS to the Oregonian for its thorough investigation of a local TV news director who has now been indicted on multiple counts of fraud and has apparently been living under a fake Social Security number. The fact that they managed to eliminate a competitor is just icing.

REGARDS to the Associated Press for taking a quote from President Obama regarding nuclear and military power a putting it in as little context as Sarah Palin did in a recent attack. (MW)

CHEERS and REGARDS to New York Newsday for its new anti-negativity policy on its sports page. On the one hand, it aims to move past the back-and-forth, drummed-up melodrama that so much recent sports coverage has become. But it also hamstrings reporters from digging into those stories that are really dirty and really good reads. (MW)

Cheers and Regards for the Week of April 19, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about all that meth you have hidden in your car’s back seat; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

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Cheers and Regards for the Week of April 12, 2009

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the stolen steaks you had in your pants at the grocery store last night. It’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to Atlantic Media for actually ponying up and paying all its interns in a time where unpaid internships are more and more the norm. Now, if we could just get some retroactive pay for all our unpaid internships over the years, it’d be fair. (MW)

REGARDS to media magnate Rupert Murdoch for attempting to close the barn door after the horse has bolted, though in this case, the barn door is payment for online news and the horse is everyone who uses the Internet. (MW)

CHEERS to Associated Press President and CEO Tom Conley for demanding that journalists get full access to war zones, even knowing the dangers of sending people there. (MW)

REGARDS to the news director at Orlando’s WMKG for basically asking his employees to rat each other out in what is ostensibly an office version of “Survivor.” (MW)

CHEERS to CBS’ 60 Minutes for a report on fossilized human remains (clips available on site) that doesn’t get mired in the creationism vs. science debate. The only disagreements acknowledged are those within the scientific community.

Cheers and Regards for the Week of April 5, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about the birds you’re importing illegally from Mexico; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

Continue reading

Cheers and Regards for the Week of March 29, 2010

If you ever get an e-mail from a journalist, there’s one portion of it you should pay attention to more than any other. No, it’s not the part where they’re asking you about all that counterfeit money you’re printing off your Lexmark; it’s the sign-off.

If it’s “Cheers,” you’re cool. You did OK. If it’s “Regards,” you pissed somebody off, and you better figure out how to fix things, quick.

We apply those same tenets here, every week.

CHEERS to Texas Monthly’s Paul Burka for detailing exactly why the Supreme Court’s ruling on Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission, an issue lost in all the turmoil of healthcare reform. Burka finds that virtually no one–be they Republican, independent, or Democrat–agrees with the Supreme Court, and lays out how the tone of upcoming elections in Texas may be a bellwether for elections nationwide. (KL)
REGARDS to longtime Village Voice columnist Michael Musto, who, in an otherwise very good interview, lumps bloggers entirely into a category of people who are competing with him. (MW)
CHEERS to ESPN.com’s Roy Peter Clark for standing up to University of Florida football coach Urban Meyer, coach of one of the nation’s top programs, for bullying an Orlando Sentinel reporter with threats to throw him out of practice. (MW)
REGARDS to actress Chloe Sevigny for throwing the Onion AV Club under the bus after they quoted her as saying that the last season of her show Big Love was “awful.” (MW)
CHEERS to AV Club interviewer Sean O’Neal for posting the audio of his talk with Sevigny to prove that he simply wrote what she said. (MW)
CHEERS and REGARDS to the Cleveland Plain Dealer for its handling of a prickly situation involving a commenter on its website.  On the one hand, good on them for exposing potential judicial corruption and dealing with some outright bad behavior. On the other, way to have a tremendous chilling effect on online discourse, such as it is. (MW and KL)